The German government is dissatisfied with Google’s “right to be forgotten” approach – Penetration Testing

The EU enacted a decree a few years ago that provided netizens with “right to be forgotten” that required Google to remove “outdated” and “insignificant” links in search results based on user requests. However, although Google has removed more than 760,000 links, the German government is still dissatisfied with Google’s actions.

While Google has processed more than 1.7 million requests, its URL removal system is currently working in a way that makes it easier for the outside to find deleted entries. Whenever Google receives a removal complaint, it will automatically forward the request to the popular lument database and replace the original page with the following text: “As a response to the legal request sent to Google, we have removed a search result, you can find more information at LumenDatabase.org.

The current problem is that the link to the original page still appears in lumen, which raises the dissatisfaction of the German authorities. The Munich District Court has issued a ban to the Internet giants that asked the company to stop forwarding the notice to the Lumen and then link to the generated database entry so that the deleted page still appears.

The post The German government is dissatisfied with Google’s “right to be forgotten” approach appeared first on Penetration Testing.

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